the woodman

Vintage Peavey Power Mixer

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Peavey XR400C

In garages across the land, adolescent dreams of rock and roll continue.  Bluegrass jams, gospel groups, punky papas play.  One thing tying them together is the staple of amplification in America, Peavey.  Most everyone paul kearsley 2009 by jim sergovicwho plays has had a Peavey at one point. I started on one.  Our group used their power mixer for the big speakers.  Even now, barely able to call myself a performing musician, I turn to Peavey when the call comes.

PAUL KEARSLEY,  farmer and musician, sounded the alarm!  His power mixer blew up a few months back when a cocktail tumbled into the heat vent.  Paul is limping through four solo gigs a week, and here comes his Summer Three with The Woodman.  

Peavey Series 400BJ labelThere are few buying opportunities in his Eastern Shore community, but right up the street I found Paul this near-vintage gem for under a day’s pay.  Mid-1990s production, a few models up from the basic version I used in high school.  Still consistently durable, still a winner.

Another sunset starts another gig.  Reggae & ska powering over the calming waters of Chincoteague Bay, bringing our souls back to Mother Earth.  Thanks, Peavey!

paul kearsley on chincoteague island 2002 by jim sergovic

Hidden Gems of Old City – Part I

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509px-Christ_Church_Philadelphia_1876

paul kearsley 2009 by jim sergovicPAUL KEARSLEY, DIRECT descendant of mid-1700s builder & architect Dr. John Kearsley*,  said to me a while back, “Hey, Woodman, what’s with the tile mosaic in the coffee shop bathroom?”  We had just enjoyed a private tour of Christ Church, at one time the most sumptuous church in the colonies, as well as the tallest structure in North America.  And now, down the street, we find ourselves in  Old City Coffee, where he noted the dual tourist-friendly customer washrooms, one of which sported a cut-tile mosaic.  While not exactly in the style of Isaiah Zagar, clearly there was an influence.  

tile closeup

Zagar made a name for himself throughout the 1960s onward as the premier cracked-tile mosaic artist, covering vast areas with his images. This bathroom mosaic was different. The tile was cut and arranged into a private story, the interpretation being at the sole discretion of the viewer.  The key word here is cut, as in sliced on a wet-saw.  Someone put a lot of work into it.

When walking through the area years later, I noted a tasteful renovation had rendered the  bathroom to an employees-only area.  Thus, this mosaic qualifies for Hidden Treasure status.  The creator is rumored to be a wanna-be-artist plumber.

*** Paul Kearsley’s great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-granduncle was  Dr. John Kearsley, the architect/builder of Christ Church.  But, disappointingly, the Doctor didn’t get the commission for Independence Hall, narrowly losing out to a design by Edmund Woolley and Andrew Hamilton.     http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Independence_Hall